Category Archives: General

9hi8ujmsdza-braden-collum

How can I start my career as a freelance healthcare interpreter?

By | General, Interpreting | No Comments
My career path to becoming a healthcare interpreter was by no means straightforward. At that time, there was no established path; it seemed almost as if those who were working as professional healthcare interpreters had started their careers by accident. In a way, I also became a healthcare interpreter by accident. In spite of the various local and national interpreter organizations and the availability of national certification for healthcare interpreters, the path has been largely undefined…Until now! The CATIE Center at St. Catherine University developed a Healthcare Interpreting Career Lattice (pictured below) for American Sign Language interpreters that all interpreters...
Read More
Globe Ring ILSC 2016

Our Solution to Your Biggest Challenges in #LanguageAccess

By | General | No Comments
At the center of the health care interpreting encounter is the deaf or non-English speaking patient (consumer). Also involved are the interpreter, the healthcare provider/staff, the patient's family, the hospital administrators, interpreter trainers and certification organizations, and legal and government officials. With such a diverse group of stakeholders, how can we all overcome our biggest challenges and provide equitable healthcare? We posed the following questions in a survey. Here's what we learned: 1. What role do you play in the equation? 2. How would you describe your biggest challenge? Healthcare provider/staff not understanding the importance of trained/certified interpreters being part of...
Read More
shutterstock_125077262

Don’t Interpret That! How to address a family member’s request to limit information during an encounter

By | General | No Comments

At our April 5 Interpreter Wellness Lunch and Learn, an interesting question was asked: What do you do when after the provider has delivered (most likely bad) news,  a family member who understands English interrupts the flow of communication and tells you, the interpreter, “Don’t tell them that”? Dr. VanDuivendyk’s answer is simple! “What you’ve got to do is make sure that family knows, in a very loving way, that your role there is to interpret the conversation between the health care professional and the patient or family. So that releases you. But that sure kicks up a lot of…

Read More
photo-1440252775693-6545cfa377ec

Pineapples and Interpreting? 4 Elements of a Great Introduction

By | General | 6 Comments

Pineapples have long been a symbol of hospitality and friendship in the Americas. Displaying a pineapple on your table, or incorporating the fruit into decorative elements like carved furniture or linens sent a message to guests of a warm welcome. In fact, it is said that if you were a house guest and the carved wooden pineapples adorning your bedposts suddenly disappeared, it meant that you had overstayed your welcome and was time for you to get packing! As interpreters, how can we in essence bring a pineapple to our interpreting assignments? That is to say, what can we do…

Read More
photo-1450155155194-cd8ac3c4e18c

Confidentiality and the Need to Talk

By | General | 4 Comments
In a recent entry on the Integrity Languages blog titled Interpreters: We Need To Talk, interpreter Jonathan Downie discusses what he calls the “silent contagion” that affects both novice and experienced interpreters: a misguided feeling that in order to adhere to the tenet of Confidentiality, “we must be some kind of secret agent.” Having served in military intelligence, where "Top Secret" can be a matter of life and death, I can appreciate the metaphor. A friend once asked for some support in applying for a job. I asked whether they had developed any training curriculum as the job posting required....
Read More

Translating Poetry: Part 3

By | General | No Comments

  [About losing the conciseness of Blues when translating into Italian] Dr. Alessandro Carrera: But let me tell you, the same thing can happen from Italian into English. Precisely with Giacomo Leopardi. Leopardi is in Italy considered the greatest literary poet after Dante, and Petrarch. And maybe even more than Petrarch. But he never had the same recognition abroad, for several reasons. But one of the reasons is that in the nineteenth century, he wrote in a very high style Italian—he could write in simple Italian if he wanted—but he moves from extremely high style, neoclassic language to more romantic…

Read More

Translating Poetry: Part 2

By | General | No Comments

  Lauren Davis: Well what about you, what’s the toughest thing you’ve ever attempted? Dr. Alessandro Carrera: Well, prose. More than poetry. I’ve translated a lot of poetry, but prose has been more difficult. LD: Interesting. AC: Because, after all, you know, I had a self-training in poetry, no one taught me, but I started writing poetry when I was eight years old, I told you, and I could think in 11-syllable lines. I could speak in 11-syllable lines if I wanted. I mean, there are people in Italy who can do that. All the farmers in the Tuscany countryside,…

Read More
Top