MasterWord provides a full array of American Sign Language (ASL) interpreting services to meet the diverse needs you may have. All of our sign language interpreters are highly qualified and certified professionals with extensive experience in areas including but not limited to:

Medical
Deaf-Blind
Mental Health
K-12 Education
Post Secondary
Legal
Courtroom
Conferences
Business Meetings
Ceremonies
Entertainment
CART

MasterWord’s American Sign Language interpreters are placed on assignments that are most appropriate for their background, skills, and knowledge. With our expertise in the sign language profession, our interpreters will facilitate communication effectively for all our consumers.

ASL Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Am I required to provide interpreting/CART services?

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 requires that a comprehensive variety of public and private services as well as employers to be accessible to all people, regardless of disability. Individuals who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, or Hard of Hearing is defined as a person with a disability under the ADA. If an individual who requires communication access approaches you, it is best to accommodate their needs by providing sign language or CART services.

Who is required to pay for interpreting/CART services?

The ADA states that all public and private agencies that provide services to the general public as well as employers with 15 or more employees must be accessible. That being said, if your agency/business is accessible to individuals without a disability, then it must be accessible to individuals with disabilities. Therefore, it is the agency/business’ responsibility to provide payment for interpreting/CART services.

How many interpreters do I need?

Interpreting is a very taxing profession, both mentally and physically. Research has proven that an interpreter’s ability to process the message and interpret it accurately diminishes drastically after a certain amount of time interpreting. Depending on the assignment, two interpreters will be scheduled when an assignment is over 2 hours. Our interpreter coordinator can assist you in determining how many interpreters will be required for your request.

Why do you have a two (2) hour minimum?

It is a standard practice in the interpreting field to bill for a two-hour minimum for any assignment. The two-hour minimum includes 1-hour travel (30 minutes before and 30 minutes after) and 1-hour interpreting time.

If the client cancels, do I still have to pay for services?

When you schedule for interpreting/CART services, you are purchasing their time. When you cancel your request, chances are unlikely to sell that time to another customer.

Can we charge the cost of interpreter/CART services to the deaf person?

It is forbidden by the ADA as well as other Federal and State laws to charge individuals with disabilities for the cost of accommodations. Often there are tax incentives available for small organizations as well as documenting this type of services as a business expense.

How much advance notice do I need before requesting interpreting/CART services?

The sooner, the better! There is never too much advance notice. The best practice in requesting for interpreting/CART services is within 2 to 3 weeks prior to the assignment. All of our services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year.

Can I ask the deaf person to bring his/her own interpreter?

The individual with a disability is not responsible for your agency/business for providing their own accommodations. It is the agency/business’ responsibility to provide and coordinate the accommodation(s).

I have a staff member who knows sign language; can s/he interpret?

Interpreting is a very complex task that requires more than just knowing sign language. The staff member should not be put into the position of interpreting for a Deaf colleague/customer as it takes away from their ability to perform their assigned duties. Additionally, there is no guarantee of quality, accuracy, or confidentiality of information when using a person who works with you. In many cases, more damage has been done by a “signer” who is trying to help out, requiring more extensive interpreting time to do damage control caused by not requesting an interpreter the first time.

Can I use a family member/friend of a deaf person to help communicate?

It is recommended you avoid using family members or friends as they may not remain impartial and be a risk to your agency/business for not providing reasonable accommodations under the ADA.

I need more time with the interpreter? How can I request an extension?

Contact our office immediately. It is possible that the interpreter assigned for your agency/business has another assignment afterwards. Our office can assist you in making adjustments to interpreters’ schedules.

Learn more about our
Video Remote Interpreting Solutions